Egypt: Birth Colonnade Plan - Mortuary Temple of Queen Hatshepsut (Deir El Bahri) - Part V


Hatshepsut Temple (Deir El-Bahri)Luxor, Egypt:
The Birth Colonnade corresponds exactly to the Punt Colonnade. As already mentioned, it was constructed to allay concern about Hatshepsut's right to the throne. The theory of divine origin was above discussion, let alone dispute, and this is shown in a scene of the ram-headed Khnum shaping} Hatshepsut and her Ka on the potter's wheel (h) under instructions from Amon who has impregnated the queen mother. Among the particularly fine representations is that of the queen mother Ahmose (I), full with child. She radiates joy and stands dignified in her pregnancy, smiling a smile of supreme contentment as she is led to the birth room.Unfortunately most of the scene in which Amon and the queen mother are borne to the heavens by two goddesses seated on a lion-headed couch, is badly damaged. But the grotesque figure of the god Bes can be seen in the lower row (j).
In the scene of the actual birth the queen mother sits on a chair which is placed on a couch held aloft by various gods. This in turn stands upon an other couch also supported by gods. The queen mother has a retinue of female attendants. Hathor then presents Hatshepsut to Amon and the twelve Kas of th e divine child are suckled by twelve goddesses (k) . Hatshepsut and her Ka have been erased but in the scene at the end of the wall (I) they pass through the hands of various goddesses who record the divine birth.
Hatshepsut's mother is shown in the presence of the ibis-headed Thoth, the ram-headed Khnum and the frog-headed Heket. She also converses with Amon who tells her that her daughter shall exercise kingship throughout the land. By depicting Hatshepsut as a boy and by repeating the theme of Amon laying a hand of blessing on her shoulder, the most important prejudices against her rule are overcome.

Egypt: Birth Colonnade Plan - Mortuary Temple of Queen Hatshepsut (Deir El Bahri) - Part V


Hatshepsut Temple (Deir El-Bahri)Luxor, Egypt:
The Birth Colonnade corresponds exactly to the Punt Colonnade. As already mentioned, it was constructed to allay concern about Hatshepsut's right to the throne. The theory of divine origin was above discussion, let alone dispute, and this is shown in a scene of the ram-headed Khnum shaping} Hatshepsut and her Ka on the potter's wheel (h) under instructions from Amon who has impregnated the queen mother. Among the particularly fine representations is that of the queen mother Ahmose (I), full with child. She radiates joy and stands dignified in her pregnancy, smiling a smile of supreme contentment as she is led to the birth room.Unfortunately most of the scene in which Amon and the queen mother are borne to the heavens by two goddesses seated on a lion-headed couch, is badly damaged. But the grotesque figure of the god Bes can be seen in the lower row (j).
In the scene of the actual birth the queen mother sits on a chair which is placed on a couch held aloft by various gods. This in turn stands upon an other couch also supported by gods. The queen mother has a retinue of female attendants. Hathor then presents Hatshepsut to Amon and the twelve Kas of th e divine child are suckled by twelve goddesses (k) . Hatshepsut and her Ka have been erased but in the scene at the end of the wall (I) they pass through the hands of various goddesses who record the divine birth.
Hatshepsut's mother is shown in the presence of the ibis-headed Thoth, the ram-headed Khnum and the frog-headed Heket. She also converses with Amon who tells her that her daughter shall exercise kingship throughout the land. By depicting Hatshepsut as a boy and by repeating the theme of Amon laying a hand of blessing on her shoulder, the most important prejudices against her rule are overcome.

Latest ancient Egyptian jewelry, information and products: