Tomb of Amenemheb Plan - Nobles Tombs - Luxor, Egypt. Part IX

This tomb has a line of pillars in the first chamber and side chambers leading off the main corridor directly behind it. It is important historically because Amenemheb was the military commander of Thutmose III, and not only does his tomb record his part in the Pharaoh's important Asiatic campaigns, but it gives exact information of the length of his reign and those of his predecessors.
Amenemheb is recorded as having accomplished two feats of unusual daring. One was during the battle of Kadesh on the Orontes when, just before the clash of arms as the opposing armies were poised and ready, the prince of Kadesh released  a mare who galloped straight for the battle lines of the Egyptian army. The plan was to break up the rank sand confuse the soldiers but Commander Amenemheb, ever on the alert, reportedly leapt from his chariot, pursued the mare, caught it and promptly slew it.
The second experience took place on the return march from Asia Minor when near the Euphrates the Pharaoh was suddenly in danger of being run down by a herd of wild elephants. Amenemheb not only managed to divert the danger and save his master from a nasty fate but apparently struck off the trunk of the leader of the herd while balancing precariously between two rocks!
Naturally such a brave and dutiful warrior should be justly rewarded by his Pharaoh for his bravery and such noble s as Amenemheb received part of the booty, decorations, and in special cases even land in recognition of their services.
Three walls in this tomb are especially note worthy. The first is in the main chamber (1) on the rear right-hand wall (a) . This is the record of Thutmose III's Asiatic campaigns, his length of reign, etc., as well as a record of Amenemheb's military honors. Near the bottom of the wall Syrians bring tribute. They wear white garments with colored braiding and there are talkative children among them.

In the chamber leading off the corridor to the right (2) is a scene on the left-hand wall (b) of a feast in progress with abundant food and drink. Servants bring bunches of flowers. The guests, relaxing in comfortable chairs or squatting on stools, are offered refreshments and the ladies in the second row all hold lotus flowers in their hands, while around their necks and in their hair they have blossoms. Attendants hold staffs wreathed and crowned with flowers. Lower on the wall are harp, flute and lute-players. It is a cheerful and lively representation.
In the rear corridor on the left-hand wall (c) is the private garden of Commander Amenemheb. Fish swim in a pool surrounded by plants. The deceased and his wife are presented with flowers.
The funerary scenes are found in the left-hand chamber (3) which leads off the rear corridor.

Tomb of Amenemheb Plan - Nobles Tombs - Luxor, Egypt. Part IX

This tomb has a line of pillars in the first chamber and side chambers leading off the main corridor directly behind it. It is important historically because Amenemheb was the military commander of Thutmose III, and not only does his tomb record his part in the Pharaoh's important Asiatic campaigns, but it gives exact information of the length of his reign and those of his predecessors.
Amenemheb is recorded as having accomplished two feats of unusual daring. One was during the battle of Kadesh on the Orontes when, just before the clash of arms as the opposing armies were poised and ready, the prince of Kadesh released  a mare who galloped straight for the battle lines of the Egyptian army. The plan was to break up the rank sand confuse the soldiers but Commander Amenemheb, ever on the alert, reportedly leapt from his chariot, pursued the mare, caught it and promptly slew it.
The second experience took place on the return march from Asia Minor when near the Euphrates the Pharaoh was suddenly in danger of being run down by a herd of wild elephants. Amenemheb not only managed to divert the danger and save his master from a nasty fate but apparently struck off the trunk of the leader of the herd while balancing precariously between two rocks!
Naturally such a brave and dutiful warrior should be justly rewarded by his Pharaoh for his bravery and such noble s as Amenemheb received part of the booty, decorations, and in special cases even land in recognition of their services.
Three walls in this tomb are especially note worthy. The first is in the main chamber (1) on the rear right-hand wall (a) . This is the record of Thutmose III's Asiatic campaigns, his length of reign, etc., as well as a record of Amenemheb's military honors. Near the bottom of the wall Syrians bring tribute. They wear white garments with colored braiding and there are talkative children among them.

In the chamber leading off the corridor to the right (2) is a scene on the left-hand wall (b) of a feast in progress with abundant food and drink. Servants bring bunches of flowers. The guests, relaxing in comfortable chairs or squatting on stools, are offered refreshments and the ladies in the second row all hold lotus flowers in their hands, while around their necks and in their hair they have blossoms. Attendants hold staffs wreathed and crowned with flowers. Lower on the wall are harp, flute and lute-players. It is a cheerful and lively representation.
In the rear corridor on the left-hand wall (c) is the private garden of Commander Amenemheb. Fish swim in a pool surrounded by plants. The deceased and his wife are presented with flowers.
The funerary scenes are found in the left-hand chamber (3) which leads off the rear corridor.

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