Tomb of Haremhab (Royal Scribe) Plan Nobles' Tomb - Luxor, Egypt. Part XIII

Not to be confused with Tomb of Haremhab at the Valley of the Kings.
This nobleman was royal scribe, scribe of recruits and the official in charge of revenue in the reigns of Thutmose III, Amenhotep II, Thutmose IV and Amenhotep III.
His tomb comprises a traverse hall and a single long corridor. On the left-hand entrance wall (a) the much damaged figures of Harmhab and his wife are being offered bowls by servants as female musicians play to them. On the left-hand rear wall (b) the deceased (obliterated) presents to the Pharaoh the contributions of
the peasants. Above this scene are scribes registering the peasants who are arranged in groups headed by standard bearers. On the right-hand rear wall (c) foreign tributes are brought in by plumed Asiatics. Note that a group of black people from the Sudan are women (upper row) who carry their babies in the well-known African way, tied to their backs. On the lower wall is a cheerful scene of blacks dancing to a drum beat. On the right-hand entrance wall (d) is the familiar funerary feast with dancing and music.
The left-hand wall of the inner corridor (e) has the traditional funerary scenes. On the right-hand wall (f) is a much damaged fishing and fowling scene.
The photo up there

Tomb of Haremhab (Royal Scribe) Plan Nobles' Tomb - Luxor, Egypt. Part XIII

Not to be confused with Tomb of Haremhab at the Valley of the Kings.
This nobleman was royal scribe, scribe of recruits and the official in charge of revenue in the reigns of Thutmose III, Amenhotep II, Thutmose IV and Amenhotep III.
His tomb comprises a traverse hall and a single long corridor. On the left-hand entrance wall (a) the much damaged figures of Harmhab and his wife are being offered bowls by servants as female musicians play to them. On the left-hand rear wall (b) the deceased (obliterated) presents to the Pharaoh the contributions of
the peasants. Above this scene are scribes registering the peasants who are arranged in groups headed by standard bearers. On the right-hand rear wall (c) foreign tributes are brought in by plumed Asiatics. Note that a group of black people from the Sudan are women (upper row) who carry their babies in the well-known African way, tied to their backs. On the lower wall is a cheerful scene of blacks dancing to a drum beat. On the right-hand entrance wall (d) is the familiar funerary feast with dancing and music.
The left-hand wall of the inner corridor (e) has the traditional funerary scenes. On the right-hand wall (f) is a much damaged fishing and fowling scene.
The photo up there

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