Tomb of Ineni - Nobles Tombs - Luxor Egypt. Part XIV


Also called Enne, This was the architect who excavated the first tomb in the Valley of the Kings, that of Thutmose I. His tomb comprises a main chamber, the facade of which is formed of pillars which carry their
murals on the rear faces, and a corridor.
Three of the square pillars carry particularly interesting murals.
The first (a) is a hunting scene with a rearing hyena biting a broken arrow as a dog rushes the wounded creature from the rear and gazelles flee. The second (b) shows Ineni's country house and he and his wife are seen in the arbour (damaged) from whence he orders his gardener round the walled estate. On the third pillar (c) Ineni can be seen before a sumptuous feast.
On the left-hand rear wall of the first chamber (d) Ineni receives tributes from swarthy Nubians including two women who carry their babies on their backs (top row). Below he receives contributions from the peasants. This part of the mural is squared up for the draughtsman. On the right-hand wall (e) is a scene in poor condition of Ineni and his pet dog watching a parade of the estate animals including sheep, goats, flamingos and geese.
On the left-hand wall of the rear corridor (f) Ineni and his wife receive offerings. On the right-hand wall (g) are more funerary scenes and offerings. The roof is decorated.
In the niche at the rear are four seated statues of Ineni's wife Thuau, Ineni himself, his father Ineni, and his sister Aahhotep. (from left to right)

Tomb of Ineni - Nobles Tombs - Luxor Egypt. Part XIV


Also called Enne, This was the architect who excavated the first tomb in the Valley of the Kings, that of Thutmose I. His tomb comprises a main chamber, the facade of which is formed of pillars which carry their
murals on the rear faces, and a corridor.
Three of the square pillars carry particularly interesting murals.
The first (a) is a hunting scene with a rearing hyena biting a broken arrow as a dog rushes the wounded creature from the rear and gazelles flee. The second (b) shows Ineni's country house and he and his wife are seen in the arbour (damaged) from whence he orders his gardener round the walled estate. On the third pillar (c) Ineni can be seen before a sumptuous feast.
On the left-hand rear wall of the first chamber (d) Ineni receives tributes from swarthy Nubians including two women who carry their babies on their backs (top row). Below he receives contributions from the peasants. This part of the mural is squared up for the draughtsman. On the right-hand wall (e) is a scene in poor condition of Ineni and his pet dog watching a parade of the estate animals including sheep, goats, flamingos and geese.
On the left-hand wall of the rear corridor (f) Ineni and his wife receive offerings. On the right-hand wall (g) are more funerary scenes and offerings. The roof is decorated.
In the niche at the rear are four seated statues of Ineni's wife Thuau, Ineni himself, his father Ineni, and his sister Aahhotep. (from left to right)

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