Tomb of Userhet Plan, The Royal Scribe. Tombs of the Nobles, Egypt Luxor, Part VI

Not to be confused with Userhet the First Prophet's Tomb, this is the tomb of the royal scribe in the reign of Amenhotep II. His name was also Userhet and the condition of his tomb is extremely good.
Rural scenes decorate the left-hand entrance wall (a). They include the branding of cattle and the collection of grain. On the rear left-hand wall (b) is a feasting scene where unfortunately all the figures of the women were destroyed by a Christian monk who made his home in the tomb. On the right-hand rear wall (c) men bring bags of gold-dust to be counted by supervisors (upper row), and in the lower row is a charming scene of men queuing beneath the trees to have their heads cut and shaved. The barber himself is busily at work on two clients. On the same wall (d) bakers are making bread (middle row) and Userhet's guests are seated (lower
row). Towards the end of the wall (e) Userhet makes offerings to his Pharaoh, who wears a colourful red tunic with yellow spots.
The most notable scene in this tomb is on the left-hand wall of the inner corridor (f). It is a hunting scene in which the charioted nobleman shoots at fleeing gazelles, jackals, hares and other animals. Userhet has the reins tied around his waist and the string of his bow taut and ready to shoot. The movement among the
fleeing animals is beautiful and rhythmic. Further along the wall (g) are scenes of fishing, fowling, and viticulture.

The right-hand wall has funerary scenes with the weeping women (h) beautifully depicted in their sorrow.

The Entrance of the Tomb of Userhet

Userhet hunting. Tomb of Userhet.

Userhet counts the bread. Tomb of Userhet

Soldiers waiting to have a haircut. Tomb of Userhet

Tomb of Userhet Plan, The Royal Scribe. Tombs of the Nobles, Egypt Luxor, Part VI

Not to be confused with Userhet the First Prophet's Tomb, this is the tomb of the royal scribe in the reign of Amenhotep II. His name was also Userhet and the condition of his tomb is extremely good.
Rural scenes decorate the left-hand entrance wall (a). They include the branding of cattle and the collection of grain. On the rear left-hand wall (b) is a feasting scene where unfortunately all the figures of the women were destroyed by a Christian monk who made his home in the tomb. On the right-hand rear wall (c) men bring bags of gold-dust to be counted by supervisors (upper row), and in the lower row is a charming scene of men queuing beneath the trees to have their heads cut and shaved. The barber himself is busily at work on two clients. On the same wall (d) bakers are making bread (middle row) and Userhet's guests are seated (lower
row). Towards the end of the wall (e) Userhet makes offerings to his Pharaoh, who wears a colourful red tunic with yellow spots.
The most notable scene in this tomb is on the left-hand wall of the inner corridor (f). It is a hunting scene in which the charioted nobleman shoots at fleeing gazelles, jackals, hares and other animals. Userhet has the reins tied around his waist and the string of his bow taut and ready to shoot. The movement among the
fleeing animals is beautiful and rhythmic. Further along the wall (g) are scenes of fishing, fowling, and viticulture.

The right-hand wall has funerary scenes with the weeping women (h) beautifully depicted in their sorrow.

The Entrance of the Tomb of Userhet

Userhet hunting. Tomb of Userhet.

Userhet counts the bread. Tomb of Userhet

Soldiers waiting to have a haircut. Tomb of Userhet

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