Hieroglyphics Lesson 2 : Nouns + Worksheets


It's been a while since I posted the first Hieroglyphics lesson. However, as I promised, these lessons will continue, till we all have a good understanding of the ancient Egyptian language. But again, let me remind you that I am not an expert, I am just a Hieroglyphics learner like yourself. I was, however, surprised that the first lesson was viewed by 12,889 people by the time of writing this. I never thought it would be that big! Thank you for your trust :)

In this lesson, we will talk about nouns in Hieroglyphics. Specially their gender, something English native speakers aren't that familiar with.

As you probably know, a noun is the name of objects, places, things, food etc. Almost everything except for John and Peter, which are names. Just for the record.

Egyptian Hieroglyphics
"Leader", 'man" and "woman" are nouns.
In many (middle) eastern languages (almost all of them, I guess), nouns have a gender, like a table, chair, house, apartment etc, these nouns can either be treated as feminine or masculine. I already speak Hebrew and Arabic and it is the same case in these two (middle) eastern languages.

There are two genders in Hieroglyphics, masculine and feminine, best way to recognize the gender of a word is to look at the end of that word, most feminine nouns end up in a t sound, while a masculine nouns don't. Here are two examples:

The word in Hieroglyphics for "man" is "S" and for a woman is "ST"

These two nouns are very obvious, a man is always masculine and a woman is always feminine, just like boy, girl, mother, father etc. However, this principle can be applied to most Hieroglyphics nouns.

hieroglyphics
More examples? Here are a few examples from a book called The Premier, I found it very useful, here are a few examples of masculine and feminine nouns:

Egyptian Hieroglyphics

Ironically many of these genders are exactly the opposite today in modern Egypt. For example, in Egyptian Arabic, "water" and "obelisk" are feminine, while "thing" is masculine. Anyway, things change, don't they?

Now, how about some worksheets? I have designed this just for you, print it out and try to draw some hieroglyphs yourself.:

P.S. Click Download at the end of the snapshot to download the worksheet booklet and print it out (only 2 pages. More to come...)


Stick around for more lessons to come, I will try to make it a habit of writing one lesson a week. By the way, many are asking me what happened to the Egyptology reading courses. Unfortunately, a few book authors contacted me and expressed their anger that I broke the copyright laws, to be honest, they have the right to be angry, however, it was sad to see the reading courses stopping. Anyway, let's stick to our Hieroglyphics lessons for now.

If you missed the simple introductory Hieroglyphics lesson, you can check it out here. As I said, it was viewed by almost 13 thousand people!

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Hieroglyphics Lesson 2 : Nouns + Worksheets

It's been a while since I posted the first Hieroglyphics lesson. However, as I promised, these lessons will continue, till we all have a good understanding of the ancient Egyptian language. But again, let me remind you that I am not an expert, I am just a Hieroglyphics learner like yourself. I was, however, surprised that the first lesson was viewed by 12,889 people by the time of writing this. I never thought it would be that big! Thank you for your trust :)

In this lesson, we will talk about nouns in Hieroglyphics. Specially their gender, something English native speakers aren't that familiar with.

As you probably know, a noun is the name of objects, places, things, food etc. Almost everything except for John and Peter, which are names. Just for the record.

Egyptian Hieroglyphics
"Leader", 'man" and "woman" are nouns.
In many (middle) eastern languages (almost all of them, I guess), nouns have a gender, like a table, chair, house, apartment etc, these nouns can either be treated as feminine or masculine. I already speak Hebrew and Arabic and it is the same case in these two (middle) eastern languages.

There are two genders in Hieroglyphics, masculine and feminine, best way to recognize the gender of a word is to look at the end of that word, most feminine nouns end up in a t sound, while a masculine nouns don't. Here are two examples:

The word in Hieroglyphics for "man" is "S" and for a woman is "ST"

These two nouns are very obvious, a man is always masculine and a woman is always feminine, just like boy, girl, mother, father etc. However, this principle can be applied to most Hieroglyphics nouns.

hieroglyphics
More examples? Here are a few examples from a book called The Premier, I found it very useful, here are a few examples of masculine and feminine nouns:

Egyptian Hieroglyphics

Ironically many of these genders are exactly the opposite today in modern Egypt. For example, in Egyptian Arabic, "water" and "obelisk" are feminine, while "thing" is masculine. Anyway, things change, don't they?

Now, how about some worksheets? I have designed this just for you, print it out and try to draw some hieroglyphs yourself.:

P.S. Click Download at the end of the snapshot to download the worksheet booklet and print it out (only 2 pages. More to come...)


Stick around for more lessons to come, I will try to make it a habit of writing one lesson a week. By the way, many are asking me what happened to the Egyptology reading courses. Unfortunately, a few book authors contacted me and expressed their anger that I broke the copyright laws, to be honest, they have the right to be angry, however, it was sad to see the reading courses stopping. Anyway, let's stick to our Hieroglyphics lessons for now.

If you missed the simple introductory Hieroglyphics lesson, you can check it out here. As I said, it was viewed by almost 13 thousand people!
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